Ron Nagle - Bad Rice

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Band/Record: Ron Nagle - Bad Rice

Label/Matrix: US 1970 Warner Bros. WS 1902

Condition Record/Sleeve: EX/EX- 

Extra Info: US PSYCH ROCK Killer !! Original 1st press LP on Green WB ...Pretty rare and almost forgotten album ...

~~ Ron Nagle's musical career started in San Francisco where he was a member of the band, The Mystery Trend in the mid-sixties. After his solo lp Bad Rice failed to set the world on fire, Nagle teamed up with Scott Matthews and emerged in a “too-cool-for-the-room” band project called The Durocs (the name of a brand of hog) that was definitely ahead of its time. At various times in his musical career, Nagle had some of his songs covered by the likes of Barbara Streisand, Pablo Cruise, The Tubes (“Don’t Touch Me There”) among others. At some point, he gave up his musical aspirations and returned to his first love— ceramic sculpture. Today, Ron Nagle is known as one of the world’s foremost sculptors of (yikes!) cups.

As far as the Bad Rice record goes, I think it’s a great album that reflects the time during which it was recorded. It has the earmarks of many a California-based recording project, featuring lots of great session players such as Ry Cooder (slide guitar), Sal Valentino (backing vocals), and John Blalely (guitar). The album was produced by noted rock eccentric Jack Nitzsche and FM radio pioneer Tom Donahue— pretty good credentials

Marijuana Hell -the song’s narrator laments a young girl’s devotion to wacky weed. I initially took this song to be a satirical rock & roll version of the movie, Reefer Madness, but after repeated listens it seemed to me that Nagle’s voice was a bit too sincere to make this case stick. Many folks felt this anti-drug tune didn’t fit the underground rock ethos of the times but I remember thinking that it was pretty dangcourageous for somebody to take this stance back then.

Frank’s Store – which is a shaggy dog story of two guys who become friends, own a store together and then the store burns down.

Family Style – catalogs a dysfunctional family which features a Mom who was a former stripper.

Besides the quirky songs that featured a variety of musical styles (country-rock, FM pop, folk, blues), Nagle’s picture, which adorned the rear cover of album, seemed to have an unsettling effect on those who gazed upon it. “Jesus Christ, this guy is ugly!”

Sadly, this fine record has not seen the light of day on compact disc. Let’s hope those yahoos at Warner Bros. or the nice folks at Rhino Handmade correct this situation in the not-so-distant future, eh? (Hot Platters)

€28,00